Posts Tagged ‘PCT Online’

During the 2012 New York Pest Expo, Alan Huot presented Adding Wildlife Control to Your Existing Business.  He pointed out that it seems to be a natural progression to any PCO’s operation. Many PCOs receive calls from existing accounts requesting their assistance not knowing whom else to call. Most calls are due to problems with raccoons, squirrels and moles. Other less common calls are due to snakes, bats, and possums.  If you’re not credentialed and well-versed in wildlife control, you’re losing out on an opportunity to diversify your business and help make it grow.

In a recent PCT online article, Humane Urban Wildlife Management: What Does it Really Mean? Sam Bryks highlights two companies in Canada that are providing Wildlife Control and doing it right. Please read the attached article to learn what it is that they are doing and to learn the Humane Urban Wildlife Management Core Standards.

(more…)

This week PCT online magazine shared details from a talk at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in which scientists are describing identification of the genes responsible for pesticide-resistance in bed bugs. We know you’ll find the following article very interesting.  For more details please click here

(more…)

PCO’s, did you know you are protecting the public health?  We encourage you to read the following article from PCT Magazine, written by Jerome Goddard. It explores the origins of pest control and public health.

Perhaps more than pest management professionals realize, the practice of pest control and public health are intricately related. For example, PMPs perform “practical public health entomology” every day, providing society a valuable health function by preventing and controlling arthropod and vertebrate pests that carry diseases.

Despite what you hear from the anti-pesticide segments of society and activist groups, pest control efforts are recognized as important (even indispensable in tropical countries) by governments worldwide and the World Health Organization. There is a pesticide-friendly position statement on the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website about the importance of mosquito spraying as part of an overall program. The CDC realizes the importance of pesticides in mosquito control and supports their use as part of an overall mosquito control program (http://1.usa.gov/W5vpAY). To get some perspective, I think it’s important occasionally to revisit where we are today and how we got here. The following article explores the origins of pest control and public health.
A long history. Long before anyone understood the “germ theory” or causes of medical conditions, it was recognized that insects might produce diseases. The ancient Babylonians worshipped a god of pestilence, which was represented as a two-winged fly, so they must have somehow related flies with disease. About 2500 B.C., a Sumerian doctor inscribed on a clay tablet a prescription for sulfur in the treatment of itch, a substance we now know kills itch and chigger mites.

(more…)

Everything old is new again as we learn in this article written by By Phil Koehler and Roberto Pereira and published in the July 2012 PCT online magazine. For more please refer back to the original article.
FLEAS ARE BACK: Are You Ready?

Flea control needs to be an integrated program that includes customer cooperation, veterinary treatment of pets and treatment of infested premises by pest management professionals.

Fleas are extremely important pests. They can thrive on pets, like cats and dogs, and they can be very irritating to humans. Some flea infestations are severe, to the point that they can cause anemia, especially for kittens and puppies.

The most prevalent veterinary problem that they cause for some pets is “flea allergy dermatitis” or FAD. FAD is caused when the flea punctures the skin for a blood meal and injects saliva. The flea saliva sets up a severe allergic reaction in the pet. As a result, the pet is severely irritated and causes self-inflicted trauma. Bacteria invade the wounds, causing pustules. The fur falls out, the wounds scab over and the pet really looks terrible. This sequence of events can be caused by a single flea bite on severely allergic animals. Because your customers feel their pets are part of their family, they will be asking your company for solutions.

(more…)

Please note: We recently read this article on PCTOnline.com and would like to share it with you all in case you missed it.

[Application Economics] Controlling Over Application

Features – InsecticidesToo often, insecticides are mixed by the gallon and wasted by the ounce. Here’s how to control economics by reducing the over application of a variety of products.
William H Robinson | January 31, 2012 |

Editor’s note: The following article was excerpted from The Service Technician’s Field Manual. See the article in the sidebar for information about this new book.
In professional pest control, emphasis is usually placed on the technology of killing pests, while the cost, or economics, of the process is often overlooked. However, designed into every application tool and insecticide is the concept of application economics. This concept considers how much insecticide is being applied, and how well the application tool works in terms of amount and cost. Application technology covers the control effectiveness of treatment, while application economics covers the cost effectiveness of it — both are important.

(more…)