Posts Tagged ‘insecticide’

Description

  1. The deer tick (Ixodes scapularis) also know as the black-legged tick is found throughout the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, and some areas of the Southwest.
  2. Deer ticks are the primary vector for a variety of diseases including Lyme disease, babesiosis, and anaplasmosis.
  3. Over the past 10 years 100,000+ cases of disease transmitted by deer ticks have been reported. Deer tick populations continue to increase leading to increased risk of contradicting a tick-borne disease. As a consequence, there is an increased demand for effective deer tick control programs in both residential and recreational areas.

Deer ticks are parasites and must feed on blood to survive and reproduce. They begin their life as tiny eggs, which hatch into sexually immature larvae about the size of a grain of sand. The mobile stages of this pest climb onto foliage or structures such as fences or buildings where they wait for potential hosts to pass by. The larval ticks infest small animals, such as mice or birds. Over several days they take a blood meal until engorged and drop off the host, usually into leaf litter or thatch. The engorged larvae mold into sexually immature, eight-legged nymphs about the size of a poppy seed. These nymphs then take a blood meal, on a larger host such as a squirrel or rabbit, feeding for four or five days. The nymphs drop off their host and eventually molt into a sexually mature eight-legged adult. The adult ticks latch onto a large mammal such as a deer where they mate. The females subsequently attach and feed for about a week, drop off and lay eggs. This cycle can take two years with peak activity occurring in different seasons. From a public health perspective, it is most important to control the nymph stage since 90% of all Lyme disease cases are due to bites from this life stage.

Management: Ticks require a moist environment to survive and thus are most often found in wooded areas. Ticks can frequently be abundant in suburban edge habitats, in stone walls, fences, and even in lawns, so treatment for deer ticks involves treating broad areas.

Some simple steps can be taken to reduce the potential for ticks bites.

  1. Keep vegetation cut low
  2. Apply tick repellents to clothing
  3. Wear long pants and long sleeved shirts when frequenting places where ticks may hide.
  4. Wear light colored clothing to make personal inspection for ticks easier

Timing is critical when treating for ticks, as nymphs are most abundant from June to August. This is the time when people are more frequently outdoors enjoying their years. Focus on targeting larvae and nymphs in the spring and summer with granular treatments. Treat using Talstar® Extra Granular Insecticide Featuring VergeTM Granule Technology at 2.3lbs per 1,000 ft.2. From September through October use liquids such as Triple Crown T&O Insecticide applied at 0.46 – 0.8 fl. oz. per 1,000 ft2 to target adult ticks. Make treatments to areas where ticks are seen on harbor including; on foliage, fencing, tall grasses, overgrown areas, perimeter of homes where ticks may overwinter (under siding or landscaping). Remember adult ticks climb up to more easily attach to a host passing by.

If adult ticks have already been found on the property, it is best to treat the entire yard with a liquid application to knock down the infestation. Triple Crown T&O Insecticide applied at 0.46 – 0.8 fl. oz. per 1,000 ft2 or Talstar® Professional applied at 0.5 – 1.0 fl. oz. per 1,000 ft2 will knock down tick infestations. Be sure to treat buffer areas adjacent to wooded areas, and spray fences and building siding where ticks are known to hide. A follow up application can be made with Talstar® Extra Verge granular insecticide at a rate of 2.3 lbs per 1,000 ft2. (100 pounds per acre) to further control the current infestation and prevent re-infestation.

A good reference for deer ticks is the “Tick Management Handbook” developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, which can be found at the link below.

http://www.ct.gov/caes/lib/caes/documents/special_features/tickhandbook.pdf

References
Photo Courtesy: CDC.Gov http://www.cdc.gov/lyme/transmission/index.html

Always read and follow label directions

Do not exceed more than 0.4lbs of Bifenthrin per acre per year.

FMC, FMC logo, Talstar, Triple Crown are registered trademarks of FMC Corporation. Verge is a trademark of Oil-Dri Corporation of America. ©2016 FMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

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Pest control applications sometimes require more skin protection than just gloves, You may need disposable coveralls to shield your body, booties to cover your shoes, or protective sleeves for your arms.

For some pest control tasks, regular work clothing provides adequate personal protection, but for others, it’s simply not enough. Furthermore, clothing may hold or absorb a toxicant, physical irritant, pathogen, or allergen, resulting in (1) a longer exposure to the hazard for the wearer, and (2) the risk of carrying the hazard to other locations, even home. Those are two things you want to avoid.

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This week PCT online magazine shared details from a talk at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in which scientists are describing identification of the genes responsible for pesticide-resistance in bed bugs. We know you’ll find the following article very interesting.  For more details please click here

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Thanks again to PCT Magazine for a great article. This article helps PCO’s understand how to best choose the right formulation. Of course, if you have any questions, ask us the next time you drop by the store or visit our Facebook page.

Here are some real-world tips on how to select the best insecticide formulation for the job.

Editor’s Note: This article is based on Gary Braness’ chapter “Insecticides & Pesticide Safety” from the recently published 10th Edition of the Mallis Handbook of Pest Control. For more information about the new Mallis book, visit www.mallishandbook.com.

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Please note: We recently read this article on PCTOnline.com and would like to share it with you all in case you missed it.

[Application Economics] Controlling Over Application

Features – InsecticidesToo often, insecticides are mixed by the gallon and wasted by the ounce. Here’s how to control economics by reducing the over application of a variety of products.
William H Robinson | January 31, 2012 |

Editor’s note: The following article was excerpted from The Service Technician’s Field Manual. See the article in the sidebar for information about this new book.
In professional pest control, emphasis is usually placed on the technology of killing pests, while the cost, or economics, of the process is often overlooked. However, designed into every application tool and insecticide is the concept of application economics. This concept considers how much insecticide is being applied, and how well the application tool works in terms of amount and cost. Application technology covers the control effectiveness of treatment, while application economics covers the cost effectiveness of it — both are important.

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Recently, PCT magazine featured an article by our friend June Van Klaveren, “Turning Green to Gold”. It discussed add-on services and how they can help pest control operators keep their technicians busy throughout the year and bring more to the bottom line. Some add-on services mentioned are handyman services, holiday lighting, snow removal, lawn care, wildlife prevention and more. Specifically, PCT Magazine showcases TAP Insulation.

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