Posts Tagged ‘Dr. Roger Gold’

“Green living” is something many American families are trying to adopt in their daily lives. Over the last decade this has become very apparent with regards to pest control. As noted in a recent PCT magazine article, “Trends of the Last Decade”, “more consumers are looking for kinder, gentler pest control solutions”.

Today’s consumers are joining the “green movement” wanting more products and services that are considered less harmful to the environment. Look at the increase in hybrid cars, “green” cleaning products and eco-friendly advertisements of all sorts. The pest control industry is no different. PCOs are adding terms like “eco-friendly” to their marketing pieces and even logos in response to this trend.

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Referring back to a recent article in PCT Magazine, another trend seen in the last decade is the loss of chemistries.  Over the last 10 years the EPA removed two major classes of pesticides from the industry: the organophosphates and the carbamates. The pest control industry relied heavily on these chemical families. Without them we have to work harder; some insects have become tougher to eliminate due to resistance issues; some species are making a comeback; and new, hard-to-control pests are gaining a toe-hold.

Dr. Roger Gold, professor and endowed chair in urban and structural entomology at Texas A&M University, is quoted in this article as saying “loss of chlorpyrifos, an organophosphate, was particularly impactful. I wish we had it back for bed bugs and some other things.”

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According to a recent report in PCT Magazine, ant activity is on the rise. “PCOs were reporting a marked rise in ant work, with ants replacing cockroaches as the most economically important pest in many parts of the country. Research commissioned by PCT also indicated the ant segment tied or surpassed termite work as the largest growth segment for much of the decade. Early on, the ant increase was blamed on warmer weather patterns throughout the U.S. as well as an increase in homeowner watering systems.”

This report indicated not only warmer weather patterns being the cause but also an increase in worldwide trading. More shipments arriving in our ports are introducing a variety of new ant species to the US. Dr. Roger Gold, professor and endowed chair in urban and structural entomology at Texas A&M University is quoted in this article saying “The boom in ant work has been characterized by a number of invasive and problematic ant species having been introduced from other parts of the world. It just seems like in the last few years with a lot of trade going on internationally that we have a lot more introductions than I remember in my whole career.”

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