Posts Tagged ‘DDT’

During the 2012 New York Pest Expo, Alan Huot presented Adding Wildlife Control to Your Existing Business.  He pointed out that it seems to be a natural progression to any PCO’s operation. Many PCOs receive calls from existing accounts requesting their assistance not knowing whom else to call. Most calls are due to problems with raccoons, squirrels and moles. Other less common calls are due to snakes, bats, and possums.  If you’re not credentialed and well-versed in wildlife control, you’re losing out on an opportunity to diversify your business and help make it grow.

In a recent PCT online article, Humane Urban Wildlife Management: What Does it Really Mean? Sam Bryks highlights two companies in Canada that are providing Wildlife Control and doing it right. Please read the attached article to learn what it is that they are doing and to learn the Humane Urban Wildlife Management Core Standards.

(more…)

Referring back to a recent article in PCT Magazine, another trend seen in the last decade is the loss of chemistries.  Over the last 10 years the EPA removed two major classes of pesticides from the industry: the organophosphates and the carbamates. The pest control industry relied heavily on these chemical families. Without them we have to work harder; some insects have become tougher to eliminate due to resistance issues; some species are making a comeback; and new, hard-to-control pests are gaining a toe-hold.

Dr. Roger Gold, professor and endowed chair in urban and structural entomology at Texas A&M University, is quoted in this article as saying “loss of chlorpyrifos, an organophosphate, was particularly impactful. I wish we had it back for bed bugs and some other things.”

(more…)

Our article Invasion of the Body Snackers – Bed bugs are Back was written long before bed bugs were making the daily news. We wanted to bring it back to your attention because it is a great follow up to the post covering Dr. Ballard’s presentation at the New York Pest Expo 2010, Advances In Bed Bug Control Protocols.

(more…)