Don’t miss the 15th Anniversary Edition of the New York Pest Expo! Learn More and Register Here!

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Luralite Cento Fly Machine. Buy 3, receive an additional one free. Through 10/31/17 

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Just look at these credits:

PEST MANAGEMENT CAREER TRAINING COURSE SESSION 4:       Friday, August 25, 2017
Blood Feeders
Stinging Insects
Occasional Invaders
Stored Product Pests
Proper Practices in Food-Handling Establishments
Credits:          7A – 5.00, 7F – 3.00, 8 – 5.00
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PEST MANAGEMENT CAREER TRAINING COURSE SESSION 5:          Saturday, August 26, 2017
Domestic Rodents
Wildlife
Review of Pest Management Operations.
Final exam. 
Credits:          CORE – 1.00, 7A – 4.00, 7F – 3.50, 8 – 4.00
Click here to register

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In PCT Magazines July publication is an article, State of the Small Fly Market, sponsored by Nisus, that we highly recommend reading.

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The Pest Management Career Training Course 

This course can be used for:

  • Required training for those wishing to become licensed in New York.
  • New York recertification credits.
  • Apprenticeship training for new employees.
  • Category-specific credits for Applicators wishing to add more categories.
  • Category-specific credits for license upgrade.

 

For new students, this course consists of classroom lectures and 2 exams.  Read the rest of this entry »

Bird Control Mini Course

Featuring:

 

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Description

  1. The deer tick (Ixodes scapularis) also know as the black-legged tick is found throughout the Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, and some areas of the Southwest.
  2. Deer ticks are the primary vector for a variety of diseases including Lyme disease, babesiosis, and anaplasmosis.
  3. Over the past 10 years 100,000+ cases of disease transmitted by deer ticks have been reported. Deer tick populations continue to increase leading to increased risk of contradicting a tick-borne disease. As a consequence, there is an increased demand for effective deer tick control programs in both residential and recreational areas.

Deer ticks are parasites and must feed on blood to survive and reproduce. They begin their life as tiny eggs, which hatch into sexually immature larvae about the size of a grain of sand. The mobile stages of this pest climb onto foliage or structures such as fences or buildings where they wait for potential hosts to pass by. The larval ticks infest small animals, such as mice or birds. Over several days they take a blood meal until engorged and drop off the host, usually into leaf litter or thatch. The engorged larvae mold into sexually immature, eight-legged nymphs about the size of a poppy seed. These nymphs then take a blood meal, on a larger host such as a squirrel or rabbit, feeding for four or five days. The nymphs drop off their host and eventually molt into a sexually mature eight-legged adult. The adult ticks latch onto a large mammal such as a deer where they mate. The females subsequently attach and feed for about a week, drop off and lay eggs. This cycle can take two years with peak activity occurring in different seasons. From a public health perspective, it is most important to control the nymph stage since 90% of all Lyme disease cases are due to bites from this life stage.

Management: Ticks require a moist environment to survive and thus are most often found in wooded areas. Ticks can frequently be abundant in suburban edge habitats, in stone walls, fences, and even in lawns, so treatment for deer ticks involves treating broad areas.

Some simple steps can be taken to reduce the potential for ticks bites.

  1. Keep vegetation cut low
  2. Apply tick repellents to clothing
  3. Wear long pants and long sleeved shirts when frequenting places where ticks may hide.
  4. Wear light colored clothing to make personal inspection for ticks easier

Timing is critical when treating for ticks, as nymphs are most abundant from June to August. This is the time when people are more frequently outdoors enjoying their years. Focus on targeting larvae and nymphs in the spring and summer with granular treatments. Treat using Talstar® Extra Granular Insecticide Featuring VergeTM Granule Technology at 2.3lbs per 1,000 ft.2. From September through October use liquids such as Triple Crown T&O Insecticide applied at 0.46 – 0.8 fl. oz. per 1,000 ft2 to target adult ticks. Make treatments to areas where ticks are seen on harbor including; on foliage, fencing, tall grasses, overgrown areas, perimeter of homes where ticks may overwinter (under siding or landscaping). Remember adult ticks climb up to more easily attach to a host passing by.

If adult ticks have already been found on the property, it is best to treat the entire yard with a liquid application to knock down the infestation. Triple Crown T&O Insecticide applied at 0.46 – 0.8 fl. oz. per 1,000 ft2 or Talstar® Professional applied at 0.5 – 1.0 fl. oz. per 1,000 ft2 will knock down tick infestations. Be sure to treat buffer areas adjacent to wooded areas, and spray fences and building siding where ticks are known to hide. A follow up application can be made with Talstar® Extra Verge granular insecticide at a rate of 2.3 lbs per 1,000 ft2. (100 pounds per acre) to further control the current infestation and prevent re-infestation.

A good reference for deer ticks is the “Tick Management Handbook” developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, which can be found at the link below.

http://www.ct.gov/caes/lib/caes/documents/special_features/tickhandbook.pdf

References
Photo Courtesy: CDC.Gov http://www.cdc.gov/lyme/transmission/index.html

Always read and follow label directions

Do not exceed more than 0.4lbs of Bifenthrin per acre per year.

FMC, FMC logo, Talstar, Triple Crown are registered trademarks of FMC Corporation. Verge is a trademark of Oil-Dri Corporation of America. ©2016 FMC Corporation. All rights reserved.

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Mosquitoes: Best Management Practices

Description

 Mosquitoes belong to the insect order Diptera (flies)
 Over 170 species in the U.S. with three important genera: Culex, Anopheles, and Aedes  Undergo complete metamorphosis: egg, larva, pupa, adult
 Require water for eggs, larval, and pupal development
 Only females take blood meals from their hosts, but both will feed on sugar from nectar

 Adults typically live for up to 14 days, but females can over-winter as adults

Mosquitoes may transmit diseases such as:

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New Promos! 

 

CB-80 17oz: $1.00 off per can/$12.00 off per case. Through 11/30/17

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The key to success in any termite job is to follow these principles:

  • Choose appropriate products and follow label directions to the letter.
  • Keep up-to-date with your state regulations.
  • Follow personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements.
  • Carry a spill kit, and have a first-aid kit on hand.
  • Use the right equipment, and always invest in the highest quality tools you can afford.
  • Don’t forget your tool-repair kits, extension cords, cleanup materials and a drill interrupter.
  • Maintain the correct pressure when performing subsoil applications.
  • Calibrate your equipment so you maintain the proper flow rate.
  • Treat all access points, and space your drill holes properly so you ensure an uninterrupted barrier.
  • Incorporate foaming in your program.
  • Use as many treatment options as practical, such as subsoil, direct wood and gallery treatments, void applications, and baiting systems, among others.

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