Archive for May, 2013

Asian Tiger MosquitoIf you’ve seen this mosquito, Cornell wants to hear from you! It’s New York state Integrated Pest Management Program is informally tracking information to gather facts from the public about the Asian Tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus).

The Asian Tiger mosquito was first introduced in the US in the 1980’s from Japan. Since it has spread quickly and is thought to now be in New York. This mosquito is similar to others in that it needs blood to produce eggs and water to hatch them in.

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It’s that time of the year and the ants are back. Unless these guys are identified properly it can be very difficult to control them. In PCT Magazine’s May Ant Control issue they emphasis the importance of proper identification of new ant species in their article Native or Invaders. Enjoy the article and if you need help identifying the species, come see us.

In January 2012, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) completed a nationwide survey of pest management professionals (PMPs) regarding treatments for ants. Only bed bugs ranked as being more difficult to control. Ants were treated by 100 percent of the companies that participated in the survey. The most common ants treated were carpenter ants (66 percent of the companies), odorous house ants (62 percent) and pavement ants (59 percent). Six other species were treated and the number varied from 20 percent to 36 percent. Another question asked in the survey was: “Do you feel the incidence of ants in your region is increasing, decreasing or remaining the same?” Results revealed that 54 percent thought the incidence was increasing, whereas 41 percent thought it was the same and only 5 percent indicated the incidence was decreasing.

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CicadaLater this month, millions of cicadas will emerge from the ground along the U.S. East Coast for the first time in 17 years. Most of the noisy, inch-and-a-half long insects have been living underground since 1996. Not all cicadas lie in wait for 17 years. “Annual” cicadas also appear every summer in some areas.

Although there will be millions of these large creatures you may hear them before you see them. They produce a loud, hovering noise. To create their unique choruses, male cicadas use ribbed tymbal membranes on their abdomens to produce sounds, while females click or snap their wings. This clamor is all done by July.

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Our industry has come a long way over the years. During this time professionals have been called a number of things, some of which we just can’t repeat. Seriously though, we have come from being referred to as the “Exterminator” and “Bug Man” to “Pest Control Operator” and “Pest Management Professional” to name a few. So when we saw this article in Pest Management Professional we really had to share. Enjoy!

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The House of Representatives recently reintroduced the PESTT Act. This bill limits the authority of the USDA’s Wildlife Services program to compete with the private sector for rodent, nuisance bird and wildlife work in suburban and urban areas regardless of the availability of services. What do you think about it?

We wanted to share PCT Magazine’s article from their February online publication. It goes into more detail with regards to the bill.

The recently reintroduced bill limits the authority of the USDA’s Wildlife Services program to compete with the private sector for rodent, nuisance bird and wildlife work in suburban and urban areas

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