Here is a fascinating article written by Dr. Stuart Mitchell and published in the 14th issue of the PestWest 411 Newsletter. Hope you enjoy learning how the Florida Fly Baiter came to be. 

Through inspiration to perspiration researchers Dr. Phillip Koehler, Dr. Roberto Pereira, Dr. Joseph Diclaro, and Jeff Hertz (Diclaro and Hertz are in the Navy) worked to develop the Florida Fly Baiter (FFB).

Through collaboration FFB research was funded by the Department of Defense Deployed War-Fighter Protection Program, which seeks to better protect troops from insect-borne diseases. Military personnel well-know the need for effective fly control. The FFB was further developed, and is now available through, the Killgerm Group and its PestWest subsidiary.

Through application the Florida Fly-Baiter is blue and highly effective as opposed to yellow fly control devices currently on the market. The key to producing the FFB was the discovery that flies are three times more attracted to blue than to yellow. In addition, research indicated yellow actually seemed to repel flies. Researchers discovered that flies have a color preference through behavioral tests that determined which color was most likely traveled toward. Electroretinograms (measure a fly’s eye reaction time) discovered the insects responded most to blue.

Enhancing the FFBs effectiveness, black stripes line the outside. The stripes mimic dark crevices in which flies like to hide.

Through admiration the FFB is now on display in the Object Theater of the National Museum of Health and Medicine. The exhibit is called “Advances in Military Medicine.”

Florida Fly Baiter research results are published in the Journal of Medical Entomology.

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